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By Laura Anthony, Esq.

 

Title IV – Small Company Disclosure Simplification

Title IV creates an exemption from the XBRL requirements for small and emerging growth companies. The Executive Office also opposes this change on the grounds that “[o]pen data disclosure systems benefit investors, issuers, and the public, increasing transparency of publicly traded companies by making their filings more easily accessible. Impeding regulators’ ability to use 21st century technological tools to regulate markets and protect investors is contrary to the SEC’s mission.”

I support Title IV and the exemption from the XBRL requirements.

 

Title V – Streamlining Excessive and Costly Regulations Review

Title V may be herculean in nature. Title V requires the SEC to review each significant regulation issued by the SEC to determine by vote of the SEC if such regulation is (i) outmoded, ineffective, insufficient or excessively burdensome; or (ii) is no longer necessary in the public interest or consistent with the SEC’s mandate to protect investors, maintain fair, orderly and efficient markets and facilitate capital formation. Title V requires the immediate review and a 10-year periodic review. The Executive Office statement of opposition states that “[T]hese requirements are unnecessarily duplicative, wasteful and costly. The SEC already complies with the Regulatory Flexibility Act and is encouraged, under Executive Order 13579, to review rules to assess whether they are outdated or excessively burdensome. Requiring a review and full Commission vote on every major rule every 10 years under full Administrative Procedure Act-style requirements would severely hinder the SEC’s ability to monitor markets and protect investors.”

 

House Passes More Securities Legislation

The Act would create the Small Business Capital Formation Advisory Committee.

 

 

H.R. 3784 – Establishing Advocate for Small Business Capital Formation and Small Business Capital Formation Advisory Committee

On February 1, 2016, the House passed H.R. 3784, the SEC Small Business Advocate Act. The Act proposes to amend the Securities Exchange Act to establish the Advocate for Small Business Capital Formation within the SEC. The office would be charged with (i) assisting small businesses and their investors in resolving significant problems with the SEC and other SROs; (ii) identifying areas where small businesses and their investors would benefit from changes in SEC and other SRO regulation; (iii) identifying problems small businesses have with security access to capital; (iv) analyzing the potential impact of proposed rules and regulations on small businesses; (v) conduct outreach programs with small businesses and their investors; and (vi) work to propose these changes to the SEC and Congress.

In addition, the Act would create the Small Business Capital Formation Advisory Committee. The committee would provide the SEC with advice on SEC rules, regulations, and policies relating to (i) capital raising by emerging, privately held small businesses and publicly traded companies with less than $250 million in public market capitalization through securities offerings; (i) trading in the securities of such businesses and companies; and (3) public reporting and corporate governance requirements of such businesses and companies.

The new proposed committee seems duplicative of the existing SEC Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies, which was organized by the SEC to provide advice on SEC rules, regulations and policies regarding “its mission of protecting investors, maintaining fair, orderly and efficient markets and facilitating capital formation” as related to (i) capital raising by emerging privately held small businesses and publicly traded companies with less than $250 million in public market capitalization; (ii) trading in the securities of such businesses and companies; and (iii) public reporting and corporate governance requirements to which such businesses and companies are subject.

 

House Passes More Securities Legislation

The bill proposes to adjust the current $1,000,000 net worth accredited investor eligibility standard every 5 years for inflation.

 

H.R. 2187 – Amendment to the Definition of Accredited Investor

Also on February 1, 2016, the House passed H.R. 2187, the Fair Investment Opportunities for Professional Experts Act, proposing an amendment to the definition of accredited investor as to natural persons. In particular, the bill proposes to add provisions to the definition of accredited investor to include (i) any natural person who is currently licensed or registered as a broker or investment adviser by the SEC, FINRA or a state securities regulator and (ii) any natural person the SEC determines by regulation to have demonstrable education or job experience to qualify such person as having professional knowledge of a subject related to a particular investment, and whose education or job experience is verified by FINRA.

In addition, the bill tweaks other aspects of the definition related to natural persons. The bill proposes to adjust the current $1,000,000 net worth accredited investor eligibility standard every 5 years for inflation. The bill tweaks the exclusion of a person’s primary residence from the calculation such that any indebtedness secured by the residence (i.e., a mortgage) that is in excess of the fair market value of the home, will be included as a liability in determining net worth. I think this creates ongoing calculation issues as the value of homes can vary widely in a short period of time.

I doubt the bill in its current form will gain any traction or ultimately become law, but we will, no doubt, see changes to the accredited investor definition in the near future. For further discussion, see my blog HERE.

Click Here To Print- LC PDF Printout House Passes More Securities Legislation

 

 


 

lauraSecurities attorney Laura Anthony is the founding partner of Legal & Compliance, LLC, a corporate, securities and business transactions law firm.  The firm’s experienced legal team provides ongoing corporate counsel to small and mid-size private companies, OTC and exchange traded issuers as well as private companies going public on the NASDAQ, NYSE MKT or over-the-counter market, such as the OTCQB and OTCQX. For nearly two decades Legal & Compliance, LLC has served clients providing fast, personalized, cutting-edge legal service.  The firm’s reputation and relationships provide invaluable resources to clients including introductions to investment bankers, broker-dealers, institutional investors and other strategic alliances.

 

Note 1:  Read Part I of this Article. Click HERE

Note 2:  Original appeared on Legal & Compliance, LLC on 15 March 2016. Click HERE

 

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